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Rays Development Blog - Requirements Traceability
A look into the mind of a VB Developer
 
# Thursday, October 30, 2008

Been doing a lot of thinking recently about tractability and how far it should really be taken. I have talked to a wide range of people over the years, ranging from project managers, development managers, team leaders and guy-at-the-desk implementers and am getting a wide range of answers.

 

Typically requirements traceability is critical to the success of a software project simply because it helps you ensure that you are doing what’s needed to satisfy the customers need and no more. But, as with may ‘processes’ in the SW realm, I think it can be taken a bit farther than it should be. I have been told by some project and development managers that having a concrete way to trace requirements all the way down to the code that implements them is critical. The ability to look at the code and know exactly why something was put into the system, and more importantly what will be impacted by making a code change, is a ‘must have’ in any good development system. In a traceability graph this usually ends up looking like this:

While I can start to see the benefit of that I also start to see where it breaks down a bit.

 

1)     Code is often used massively between functional areas so it leads to a very large traceability tree. In my opinion once you get past a certain number of branches (a number I have not really quantified yet but I will know it when I see it) the code simply gets qualified as ‘important’ and traceability at that point really looses some value.

2)     The current state of tools at this point really offers no way to store this metadata in the source in a simple, and automated, manner. This leaves it up to the developer to perform this task (usually in the comments) and that means that the developer gets more work to do. As we all know, the more time something takes that does not give the person doing it much (if any) direct value, the more likely it is that the task does not get done. This means that the traceability data can immediately become suspect causing no one to believe it and thus again it looses its value.

3)     Why do we really care that FunctionX was written to explicitly fulfill functional requirement F-101 and thus Business requirement B-203?

 

 

I personally think that this deep traceability is only there to fulfill management needs to see neat charts (ok, maybe I could have worked on the color scheme a bit) and graphs. I also think that this is a way for managers to feel that they are ensuring value from their developers by making sure that the developers are only writing what is needed to satisfy the requirements and not a line of code more. In fact many developers seem to be from my side of the camp, but some of them take it way to far in the other direction. Their opinions are that unless the system can be ensured as ‘good’ why track any of it at all? They know what the requirements are, they should be left on their own to implement the code in a way that satisfies the requirements and that’s it. Why do they need to justify their work at all as long as the end product works well and satisfies the stated requirements?

 

What you end up with here is this:

Who wins form this? No one does. Most of the time when you have an all or nothing strategy the outcome is completely non-productive. Is it good idea to have requirements traceability? Sure it is. I think most sensible developers and managers alike will agree that knowing why you are doing something, what the impact of changes are, and how things get tested are all good (great) ideas. The frustration comes in trying to come up with a solution that satisfies both camps. Something that gives both the managers and developers what they want.

 

I think that something is a very tight level of traceability between all levels of requirements, both up and downwards, but then to augment that into the code by completing the traceability down to the test cases and stopping there. With this you get something that looks like this:

Notice that you now have traceability form business requirements all the way down to the test cases just like you did before but you have left the code out of it. Some folks might say that this is missing the need (want) to trace requirements to the code that implements them but take a closer look and you will see that it really does not. The code traceability has not been skipped over, it has been preserved due to the physical connection to the test cases.

 

Consider this. Every test case should be there to explicitly support a use case, or at least one part of a use case. This means that every test should be traceable back to some code that it is testing. This ‘traceability’ can be seen in one of two ways. First, most test cases that reference no code inside them are easy to spot, since they have no code inside, and second, you can easily run an automated tool to check the source code of a test case that fails to reference any code. Clean, simple and it leaves the developer out of it which is good.

 

Now consider the other use of full traceability down to the code level. The ability to potentially spot dead code, or code that does not specially trace back to any requirement. You have not lost here wither since you can again use an automated tool to run a call tree backwards from all the test cases and ensure that you have no code written that is not reachable by a test. Actually this should be part of a normal test regime anyway and is part of what is called code coverage analysis, making sure that as much of your code is tested as possible.

 

Have you lost anything? No. Well maybe some work. In fact if you take a look back to your test practices you are already probably doing this almost 100% if you are using code coverage analysis. If you are not doing code coverage, start. Look at what it gives you. Management gets what they want, development gets what they want and everyone is happy. This is a classic win-win scenario that I think everyone can live with.

Thursday, October 30, 2008 6:13:03 PM (Eastern Standard Time, UTC-05:00)  #    Comments [0]   Design | Requirements  | 
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